Adam savages butthole

Added: Joel Yeung - Date: 11.10.2021 22:35 - Views: 13194 - Clicks: 1171

Longterm haircut and beard trimming strategies are discussed this week as we enter week three of working from home. Adam tells the harrowing tale of a hand injury he sustained late last week that was truly frightening, Norm finishes the West Wing, and we point to some resources for makers 3d printing PPE for health care workers. I sympathise with the allergies. Injuring myself whilst working alone has always been something of a concern for me. I understand the allergies, but I did grow out of them. I can remember way back in another life when I had a Vesper motor scooter that I took from home to college.

One beautiful spring day the allergies were real bad. I stopped the scooter got off and sat on the curb in the middle of Boston. A cop saw me, stopped and asked what happened. I told him and the next thing I know he came back with a very large paper cup with water to wash my eyes out.

He told me he had it also and sympathized with me. I actually had them reconstructed 2x but didnt take and then had to have them removed. Also I wore a titanium tungsten wedding ring they couldnt cut off, I didnt ask how they got it off during first surgery but now wear a silicone ring and am very happy with it while working on projects now. Not as bad as it sounds. I did have a couple of slips when bulding my house though. Saws make really messy cuts! There were little tendrils of fat sticking out and everything. Had a bunch of stitches in that one.

Second one, I was trimming a window sill end cap with a stanley knife. As it was still hanging on by a bit of skin and flesh, I decided to super glue it back on. I glued it on a little bit wonky but other than that, it healed up pretty well! I have taken to wearing no Jewelry these days. Adam is lucky! Gotta ask: what kind of safety protocols are in place in the cave? Does Adam have lock-out-tag-out procedures to follow when servicing equipment that can bite? While I have a few stories of my own injuries, and several stories of witnessing others get hurt in shop, I feel that this one is my most notable.

We also dabbled in aerospace projects, and were listed as a tier two supplier for NASA. This is about 2 years after the space shuttle Columbia disaster. We were contacted for a rush job to manufacture a testing arm for the wind tunnels at NASA. The item we were making is a large steel shaft with pockets milled to house vibration sensing equipment to test the heat shield panels under varying conditions. Myself being the young guy in the shop, I would gather tooling and get everything ready for the machinist to do their job.

After getting this large forged steel shaft placed into the lathe, with steady rest and tail stock, I turned it over to the lead manual machinist. He was then called into the office to answer a call from his doctor. He was then rushed out to emergency surgery after a biopsy came back with bad news. The next day several individuals from NASA arrived to supervise me while I was turning this 6-inch diameter 6-ft long shaft. After several days of manually roughing and finishing the shaft, while being observed by quiet NASA engineers, I was putting the finishing touches I.

It was a Saturday and only the owner of the company and myself were present. The owner walked away to take a call and I was leaning against the tail stock and filing the leading edge on the end of the shaft. For those not familiar, you file at a slow RPM, and always use a damn handle on the file. I was doing both of those things, but being a young individual, I was wearing a ill fitting Metallica t-shirt my favorite at the time. While I was leaning on the tail stock, I felt someone tapping my arm.

I looked over to what I assumed was the owner of the company, but no one was there. As I look down, the short sleeve of my shirt had gotten caught between the tailstock live center and the part. By the time I noticed this, the t-shirt had wrapped around the center at least two times.

Keep in mind, the RPM of the lathe was very slow, but nonetheless this was a 20hp lathe. I was too far away from the stop pedal and emergency stop button. I yelled for some help, but the owner had gone outside for some damn reason. I then did the only thing I could do which was to pull against my sleeve to try to get myself free. I knew that this machine would pull me in, flip me over the part, then slowly drag me under the part, then continue to do so over and over. I started pulling as hard I could, leveraging my feet against the casting.

I managed to rip the sleeve off my shirt and free my arm. The aftermath was a lot of torn skin and major bruising completely around my arm close to the armpit. I immediately shut off the machine, proclaimed the part finished, and left work. I healed up pretty well and still have full use of my arm, though it was pretty rough and sore as the muscle healed.

But I still have that T-shirt hanging in my closet to remind me. I broke the first and second digit of the finger and lost the fingernail on my finger and part of the nail on my thumb. I am right handed, because of course I am. I will never again wear gloves near a lathe I damn well knew better and only yesterday was willing to turn something I was an avid turner before the accident because a hammer handle broke and COVID concerns kept me from just running out to buy a new one.

And yeah, what Adam said: I felt a damn fool taking that to the doctor because it was squarely my fault. Shame to say the least. Shame will hopefully keep me from repeating that mistake again. Lots of authors are reading their work online while everyone is stuck at home. I worked with a lathe during my first go at college and it was terrifying at first.

They were Cincinnati Milicron Lathes. I was fortunate not to sustain any injuries other than minor cuts and scrapes. Putting the 4 jaw Chuck in the thing was the scariest to me because it had the jaws protruding out. I was always afraid I was going to reach in the wrong place and just watch a finger disappear.

I have never gotten a major injury while working in my personal shop! However, I worked for a granite counter top shop in the QC department and got two pretty nasty injuries. In QC we were tasked with…you guessed it! Two ways you could do it: 1 If they are under around lbs me and my co-worker would lift and slide them onto the tables hopefully not breaking them. The first nasty injury you could probably guess was a torn lumbar from lifting lb slabs of granite over and over again five days a week for eight hours a day.

That was 3 months of physical therapy and still being worked on everyday with routine exercise. The second one was a lot more like what happened to you. After the pieces were checked, fixed, and cleared we would load them onto a flat cart all together as one big pretty order to get picked up. Well, one day as me and my co-worker finished putting the last sink counter on the cart the entire cart decided to fall over with all six granite pieces.

Thankfully most of me was out of the way, but my left thumb was not so lucky…It got stuck between two pieces and I nearly lost my thumb, luckily I got it out and my co-worker was a recently retired army medic. Huge laceration that needed a bunch of superglue and of course months to lose and regrow a nail!

Thank you for all the great content over the years! Most have been manageable with skin glue or dressings. Like Adam, I also have a large disc sander and part of the install process for me was making sure it would stop in seconds. So rather than the 5ish minutes it took to stop on its own, it now stops in 5ish seconds! Adam, I can relate to what you went through especially mentally.

Adam savages butthole

email: [email protected] - phone:(522) 673-1945 x 2125

So, seen any (alleged) pictures of Adam Savage lately?